Mushroom Inoculations

Since my last post on May 18th, we (friends and student volunteers with Lewis Ginter) have been busy inoculating pasteurized wood chips with mushroom spawn to make mycofilters. All mycofilters were, as much as possible, identical in content, however, their containers differed. Buckets (with holes drilled in the bottom) were used to make the “bench scale” study filters, and burlap sacks were used to make the field study filters.

May 21, 2016

Remember those beautifully myceliated jars of Stropharia rugoso-annulata mushroom spawn?! Well, we had to shake ’em up!

Shaking jars full of mushroom spawn for inoculating bucket filters for the mycofiltration bench study! #mycoremediation

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Each grain of rye that the mushroom mycelium colonized in each jar, serves as a battery of nutrients for the mycelium to jump off of onto the woodchips. So, the more “batteries” spread out into the wood chips, the faster the mycelium can take over!

Bucket mycofilter Recipe (for one filter):

  1. 5 gallon bucket with 11 holes driled in the center of the bottom
  2. 5 gallon bucket filled with pasteurized wood chips
  3. 3% by weight Stropharia rugoso-annulata grain spawn (about 1/3 of a 1/2 gallon jar)
  4. Gauze & tape

Step 1-All equipment and buckets were sterilized with 70% isopropyl alcohol.

Step 2-Wood chips and grain spawn were combined, thoroughly mixed, then transferred                    to a clean 5 gallon bucket with holes drilled in the bottom.

Step 3- Each bucket was covered with a lid (not fully closed) or trash bag.

Step 4-A small piece of gauze was taped over the holes (to prevent worms from entering                    the bucket)

Step 5- The buckets were left to rest, in a shady area, to begin mycelium colonization.

IMG_8096

Good night mycelium!

June 4, 2016

IMG_8072

Burlap Sack mycofilter Recipe (for one filter):

  1. pasteurized burlap sack (most of ours were a coffee bean bag cut in half and sewn with hemp string)
  2. about 9 gallons of pasteurized wood chips
  3. 3% by weight Stropharia rugoso-annulata grain spawn (about a 1/2 gallon jar)
  4. Hemp string and needle (a large paper clip worked nicely)

Step 1-All equipment and buckets were sterilized with 70% isopropyl alcohol.

Step 2-Wood chips and grain spawn were combined, thoroughly mixed, then transferred                    to a burlap sack and sewn shut.

Step 3- Each sack was stacked and covered (in the empty bin where we pasteurized the                        wood chips) where the bottom bags had contact with the soil.

Step 4- The sacks were left to rest, to begin mycelium colonization.

IMG_8093

Mycelium hits the sack.

June 5, 2016

Contamination check up! If we saw a spot with green mold (Trichoderma spp.) contamination on the surface of the bucket filters, we excavated it and sprayed the spot with hydrogen peroxide.

Katrina searching for contamination in the mycofiltration buckets. #mycoremediation

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June 11, 2016

A fully colonized bucket mycofilter ready for the first round of bench trials!

⚡️💙🍄💙⚡️

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A peek at the burlap mycofilters show that the mycelium is colonizing, but still needs some time.

Mycelium peeking through the burlap mycofilters! #mycoremediation

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-BIG thank yous- out to the Lewis Ginter student volunteers, for cleaning buckets, shaking jars and shoveling stinky wood chips; SeftonCoffee for donating burlap bags; Ben for saving pickle and feta buckets and James/Sonia/Kelsey/Andrew/Katrina/Q/Patrick, for sewing bags, getting buckets, filling bags, combating Trichoderma spp. and enduring the lingering stink!

Mush love via the mycelial web~

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